A LITTLE BEESWAX INFO

Beeswax is a byproduct of honey production. It makes wonderful lip balms, hand lotions, hand creams, moisturizers, in cosmetics, wood finishes, waxes, leather polishes; waterproofing products, and dental molds. 


It is impervious to water and unaffected by mildew. It has a melting point of 143 to 148 degrees F. and should only be heated using a double boiler as it is flammable when subjected to fire and flames. It is pliable at 100 degrees F.

Beeswax is produced by the (female) worker honeybees. The wax is secreted from wax glands on the underside of the bee’s abdomen and is molded into six-sided cells which are filled with honey, then capped with more wax. When honey is harvested, the top layer of wax that covers the cells, the cappings, must be removed from each hexagon-shaped cell. 

Bees use Propolis ( derived from resins and essential oils from local plants and pine trees ) to “glue” together the wooden frames in their hive, and that must be scraped off so the frames can be separated. The beeswax, which contains some honey, bee parts, and other impurities, must be melted and filtered or strained. 


Most beeswax is gold or yellow but can also be in shades of orange, brown, etc. The color of the wax is in most part determined by the type of plants the bees collect nectar from. Beeswax has a delightful, light fragrance of honey, flower nectar and pollen. 


Beeswax makes superior, slow burning candles. Beeswax burns more beautifully than any other wax. It exudes a faint, natural fragrance of honey and pollen. When candles are made with the proper size of wicking, they are smokeless, drip less, and burn with a bright flame.

If you wonder why beeswax is so expensive, consider this: It has been estimated that bees must fly 150,000 miles to produce one pound of wax. Bees must eat about six pounds of honey to secrete a pound of wax. For every 100 pounds of honey a beekeeper harvests, only one to two pounds of beeswax are produced.

Prevent Rust

Coat things like hand tools, cast iron pieces and shovels to prevent them from rusting out. You can even rub beeswax on the wooden handle of your shovel to help protect against wear and tear.

Cheese Waxing

If you produce your own cheese, beeswax is the best natural cover for cheeses. If the cheese is wet, you will need to let it dry before applying the hot wax. This is to ensure a proper seal because wax will not adhere to wet surfaces. Beeswax works well for sealing the because it has a low melting point.

Brilliant Uses For Beeswax

Beeswax is used in many skin care products because it provides a protection against irritants while still allowing the skin to breathe. It also offers anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and antiviral benefits making it helpful in treating skin irritation.

Waxed Thread

Waxed thread is often used in handmade crafts such as hand-sewn leather goods and making jewelry. The wax on the thread provides lubrication that can make sewing easier. Plain thread can be rubbed against a cube of beeswax, coating the thread in the wax.

beeswax
beeswax

Coating Nails & Screws

Once you coat your nails and screws with beeswax, they do not splinter the wood while you hammer them in.

beeswax

Wood Lubricant

Rub beeswax on sliding glass doors, windows or drawers that tend to stick to restore smooth movement. Beeswax is also a fantastic lubricant for oiling very old furniture joints.

Envelope Seal

You can make a beeswax seal and apply it to an envelope that you are sending out. This would be great for an invitation to a wedding or baby shower.

beeswax

Waterproof Shoes and Boots

Rub the beeswax over the entire shoe. Next, use a blow dryer to melt the wax all over the shoe then let set for about 5 minutes before wearing!

beeswax

DIY Shoe Polish

Restore leather boots, shoes, pocketbooks, and more with this basic shoe polish formula. Combine and heat 2 oz of oil and 1/2 oz beeswax until the beeswax is melted. Remove from the heat and stir in 1/2 to 1 tsp pigment, adding more for a darker color. Makes ½ cup, about what you’d buy in the store. Store in a small jar or tin.

Beeswax For Hair

Beeswax is used as a remedy for dry hair, to help start and maintain dreadlocks and as a wax for a man’s beard or mustache. Combine & heat equal parts beeswax and coconut oil. Allow to cool and set. Using small portions at a time, work it into the mustache. Comb to style. 

Grease Cookie Sheets

If you have a block of wax, you can simply rub it over your pans and use it in place of butter or oil. Beeswax is edible so this is perfectly safe. It works best if you warm the sheet a bit first. You can also melt the wax and apply it that way. Over time the pan will take on a permanent coat of wax, eliminating the need to grease every time.

Candles & Luminaries

Beeswax candles burn brighter, remove toxins from the air and give off a sweet, warming honey aroma which gets accentuated when mixed with other essential oils. Making them is pretty simple, too.

Furniture Polish

To make beeswax furniture polish melt 1 T. of grated beeswax, stir in 3 T. of coconut oil until melted. When this cools and hardens, use a clean cloth to rub it onto your wood furniture. Then using another cloth, buff the furniture until all residue is removed.

Corrosion Control

Beeswax actually prevents bronze items from getting tarnished. To guard against oxidation caused by moist air, brush on a solution of 1/3 pound beeswax melted in 1 quart turpentine. Buff it with a towel to create a thin, hard coat. Similarly, you can seal a copper sink by rubbing it with softened beeswax and polishing off the excess with a lint-free rag.

I’ve known about the amazing benefits of HONEY for a long time…but never knew BEESWAX had so much to offer as well. After compiling this list I have realized I need to start utilizing it more in my life. It truly is an amazing substance!